Fighting TB in the Slums of Mumbai

Partnership Objectives

  1. Decentralize care by creating new DOTS (Directly Observed Treatment Short Course) centers, laboratories and collection centers run by NGO partners.
  2. Strengthen coordination within the public service and public/private collaboration by mobilizing private doctors to work with DOTS.

The program’s success has been recognized by Indian health authorities, and the government plans to replicate the project in other regions, applying the Inter Aide model. The program’s success has been recognized by Indian health authorities, and the government plans to replicate the project in other regions, applying the Inter Aide model. Copyright Sanofi

What are the health needs and challenges?

In India, a family where one member has tuberculosis will lose 30 to 60% of its income depending on whether the victim is working. In poor and densely populated areas of a large city such as Mumbai, where 3% of the population has tuberculosis (3 new patients each year for every 1,000 inhabitants), it is one of the leading causes of death, disability and unemployment.

Description of partnership activities and how they address needs and challenges

The Foundation supports the program of the NGO Inter Aide to help health authorities and local stakeholders reduce the economic impact and risk of tuberculosis infection in the slums of Mumbai.

The program provides capacity for public health centres to improve care and patient monitoring, reduce regimen non-compliance, and drive up the cure rate. The teams visit private doctors in slums to encourage them to send their patients to public or association-based centres where treatment will be given free of charge. They set up centres to deliver DOTS (Directly Observed Treatment Short Course) inside the slums (49 centres work with support from the Indian authorities). They are conducting awareness campaigns to alert people to the risks of this disease.

Lessons learned

Many different stakeholders must be involved in a global approach so that initiatives in the field will be successful.

Summary of impact and forward looking information

In 2013, 324,000 people benefited from awareness-raising actions. The same year, 4,889 patients were screened and put on treatment in the DOTS centres set up under this program, and 2,596 patients were channelled to various private and public centres due to awareness raising actions by doctors working in shanty towns.

The program’s success has been recognized by Indian health authorities, and the government plans to replicate the project in other regions, applying the Inter aide model. 

Partnership information

Company(ies) Sanofi

Partner(s) ALERT-INDIA, Father Ceyrac Association, Indian Ministry of Health, Inter Aide, Local government & associations, Local hospitals & health centers & patient groups, LSS (India), MJK Life Science Solutions, NSVK, India, PATH Malaria Vaccine Initiative (MVI), Tuberculosis Control Societies (municipalities), World Health Organization (WHO)

Type of Partner(s) Academia / Hospitals, Government, IGOs, NGOs, Other Business, PDPs

Therapeutic Focus Infectious Diseases

Disease(s) Tuberculosis

Program Type(s) Availability of Treatment - Product Donations, Health System Infrastructure - Development of Physical Infrastructure, Health System Infrastructure - Outreach & Medical Services, Health System Infrastructure - Training, Prevention Programs - Awareness & Outreach

Targeted Population(s) Children, Marginalised / Indigenous People, Men, Mothers, Patients in needs of treatment, People with low income, Women, Youth

Region(s) South Asia

Number of Countries 1

Country(ies) India

Start Date 2008

More information Sanofi Espoir Foundation

Completed date 2013

« In Mumbai, where there is still a high incidence of tuberculosis, patients are reluctant to be screened. Information campaigns on the streets explain that tuberculosis can be cured and that DOTS treatment is freely available. »